Frequently Asked

Questions

You may have curiosity for or questions about Hypnosis, how, why, and if it works. Let's visit some of the most common questions. 

What is Hypnosis?

Hypnosis is simply a natural state of deep relaxed focus. Each of us enters such a state - often called a trance - at least twice a day: when we are falling asleep and waking up. That kind of fuzzy, timeless state between dreaming and awake is a trance state. When a nine-minute snooze-button seems to give you enough time to have an-hour long dream, that's a trance state.

There are many other times that people enter a natural state of trance: driving, watching T.V., a long-familiar walk, listening to music, or working on a favorite hobby or activity. Ever feel that "in the flow" state, where everything you were doing was effortless? You were probably in a light trance doing what you know and enjoy. These are all "altered states of consciousness," and all are levels of trance.

After their first session, some may say, "I wasn't hypnotized - I knew what was going on the whole time!" That makes sense because you were actively engaged. Hypnosis is a state of significantly heightened awareness and focus while in a deep state o trance, and that what allows us to reach the subconscious mind.

How long has hypnosis been practiced?

Hypnosis is one of the world's oldest sciences. Incredibly, ancient hieroglyphics show that the Egyptians were using hypnosis as early as 3,000 B.C. There is evidence the Greeks and the Mayans used it as well. While hypnosis has had a place in society for thousands of years, it has also gained recognition as a legitimate modern medical practice, where it is called hypnotherapy. It is being used more and more in therapy sessions throughout the modern medical practice today.

How does it work?

Hypnosis is a quick and straightforward way to access the subconscious mind to get to the reasons behind a clients' behavior and start helping right away. Traditional methods, such as talk therapy, spend much of their time merely trying to get past mental and emotional blockages, going down memory lane, so to speak, to understand the subconscious reasons for their patients' issues. Hypnosis doesn't need memory lane; it just needs someone ready and motivated for the change they wish to see in their lives. In 2001, the British Psychological Society reported that: "Enough studies have now accumulated to suggest that the inclusion of hypnotic procedures may be beneficial in the management and treatment of a wide range of conditions and problems encountered in the practice of medicine, psychiatry, and psychotherapy."
 

What is Hypnosis?

Hypnosis is simply a natural state of deep relaxed focus. Each of us enters such a state - often called a trance - at least twice a day: when we are falling asleep and waking up. That kind of fuzzy, timeless state between dreaming and awake is a trance state. When a nine-minute snooze-button seems to give you enough time to have an-hour long dream, that's a trance state.

There are many other times that people enter a natural state of trance: driving, watching T.V., a long-familiar walk, listening to music, or working on a favorite hobby or activity. Ever feel that "in the flow" state, where everything you were doing was effortless? You were probably in a light trance doing what you know and enjoy. These are all "altered states of consciousness," and all are levels of trance.

After their first session, some may say, "I wasn't hypnotized - I knew what was going on the whole time!" That makes sense because you were actively engaged. Hypnosis is a state of significantly heightened awareness and focus while in a deep state o trance, and that what allows us to reach the subconscious mind.

How long has hypnosis been practiced?

Hypnosis is one of the world's oldest sciences. Incredibly, ancient hieroglyphics show that the Egyptians were using hypnosis as early as 3,000 B.C. There is evidence the Greeks and the Mayans used it as well. While hypnosis has had a place in society for thousands of years, it has also gained recognition as a legitimate modern medical practice, where it is called hypnotherapy. It is being used more and more in therapy sessions throughout the modern medical practice today.

How does it work?

Hypnosis is a quick and straightforward way to access the subconscious mind to get to the reasons behind a clients' behavior and start helping right away. Traditional methods, such as talk therapy, spend much of their time merely trying to get past mental and emotional blockages, going down memory lane, so to speak, to understand the subconscious reasons for their patients' issues. Hypnosis doesn't need memory lane; it just needs someone ready and motivated for the change they wish to see in their lives. In 2001, the British Psychological Society reported that: "Enough studies have now accumulated to suggest that the inclusion of hypnotic procedures may be beneficial in the management and treatment of a wide range of conditions and problems encountered in the practice of medicine, psychiatry, and psychotherapy."
 

What is Hypnosis?

Hypnosis is simply a natural state of deep relaxed focus. Each of us enters such a state - often called a trance - at least twice a day: when we are falling asleep and waking up. That kind of fuzzy, timeless state between dreaming and awake is a trance state. When a nine-minute snooze-button seems to give you enough time to have an-hour long dream, that's a trance state.

There are many other times that people enter a natural state of trance: driving, watching T.V., a long-familiar walk, listening to music, or working on a favorite hobby or activity. Ever feel that "in the flow" state, where everything you were doing was effortless? You were probably in a light trance doing what you know and enjoy. These are all "altered states of consciousness," and all are levels of trance.

After their first session, some may say, "I wasn't hypnotized - I knew what was going on the whole time!" That makes sense because you were actively engaged. Hypnosis is a state of significantly heightened awareness and focus while in a deep state o trance, and that what allows us to reach the subconscious mind.

How long has hypnosis been practiced?

Hypnosis is one of the world's oldest sciences. Incredibly, ancient hieroglyphics show that the Egyptians were using hypnosis as early as 3,000 B.C. There is evidence the Greeks and the Mayans used it as well. While hypnosis has had a place in society for thousands of years, it has also gained recognition as a legitimate modern medical practice, where it is called hypnotherapy. It is being used more and more in therapy sessions throughout the modern medical practice today.

How does it work?

Hypnosis is a quick and straightforward way to access the subconscious mind to get to the reasons behind a clients' behavior and start helping right away. Traditional methods, such as talk therapy, spend much of their time merely trying to get past mental and emotional blockages, going down memory lane, so to speak, to understand the subconscious reasons for their patients' issues. Hypnosis doesn't need memory lane; it just needs someone ready and motivated for the change they wish to see in their lives. In 2001, the British Psychological Society reported that: "Enough studies have now accumulated to suggest that the inclusion of hypnotic procedures may be beneficial in the management and treatment of a wide range of conditions and problems encountered in the practice of medicine, psychiatry, and psychotherapy."
 

Will I lose control?

Losing control is a Hollywood myth. You always have control, and you can continuously hear what's going on. Hypnosis is a simple state of relaxed deep focus. It is a natural state that you enter at least twice a day, when falling asleep and right before waking up, And for some, probably much more often than that. If you want to come out of trance at any time, and you wish to be fully awake, you can count to yourself "1 - 2- 3" and open your eyes.

How do I choose a good hypnotherapist?

Talk to them over the phone; many offer a free consultation to make sure the two of you will make a good team. Ask questions! Ask about your concerns, any fears, how the process works, the fees involved, the time commitment, and anything that comes up for you.


Select a hypnotherapist that feels friendly and is easy for you to understand and follow. You'll be either in sessions or listening to recordings of their voice many times, so you need to be able to understand them and enjoy hearing their voice. Their voice should be pleasing to you.


If you are worried about qualifications, ask if they are members of any professional hypnotherapy organizations and about their training. Still, usually, most of this is already listed on their website. Ask them for their code of ethics if not readily available. Ask for references if you like! If they can't supply you with any, be wary. And, you can always check your local Better Business Bureau to see if there have been complaints filed in the past on this person.


All in all, you should be comfortable with the person's demeanor, voice, and instructional style. Often, the first 10 minutes of your free consultation with a hypnotherapist will be an introduction to hypnosis and a bit of chat about the changes you would like to make. If you find the hypnotherapist rubbing you the wrong way during or after, you should say that you don't think you are quite ready to move forward, then interview other hypnotherapists until you find one you like.

 

How is hypnotherapy different than affirmations?

Hypnotherapy has the benefit of being able to communicate with the subconscious mind in a two-way approach. When we use affirmations, it is in the attempt -often hope- to speak to our subconscious so that it results in the changes we seek. While affirmations are great daily reminders, they do not facilitate direct response from our subconscious mind, and this is why many who use them get frustrated with their outcomes.


A post-hypnotic suggestion is also unique because it is more direct, more specific, and more immediate. An affirmation of, "Every day I wake more positive than the day before" may ideally sound good, but it's missing the elements of; How will I know this? When can I be sure? Is it working? Am I more positive? With hypnosis, we set markers to let us know that you are making progress and getting the results you want.


The language of hypnosis and affirmations is similar as both are expressed in the present tense and offered positively. If you find a hypnotherapist that uses negation words like "don't smoke," "can't have,” "won’t fear” in a direct hypnotic suggestion: choose a different hypnotherapist!

 

What is Hypnosis?

Hypnosis is simply a natural state of deep relaxed focus. Each of us enters such a state - often called a trance - at least twice a day: when we are falling asleep and waking up. That kind of fuzzy, timeless state between dreaming and awake is a trance state. When a nine-minute snooze-button seems to give you enough time to have an-hour long dream, that's a trance state.

There are many other times that people enter a natural state of trance: driving, watching T.V., a long-familiar walk, listening to music, or working on a favorite hobby or activity. Ever feel that "in the flow" state, where everything you were doing was effortless? You were probably in a light trance doing what you know and enjoy. These are all "altered states of consciousness," and all are levels of trance.

After their first session, some may say, "I wasn't hypnotized - I knew what was going on the whole time!" That makes sense because you were actively engaged. Hypnosis is a state of significantly heightened awareness and focus while in a deep state o trance, and that what allows us to reach the subconscious mind.

How long has hypnosis been practiced?

Hypnosis is one of the world's oldest sciences. Incredibly, ancient hieroglyphics show that the Egyptians were using hypnosis as early as 3,000 B.C. There is evidence the Greeks and the Mayans used it as well. While hypnosis has had a place in society for thousands of years, it has also gained recognition as a legitimate modern medical practice, where it is called hypnotherapy. It is being used more and more in therapy sessions throughout the modern medical practice today.

How does it work?

Hypnosis is a quick and straightforward way to access the subconscious mind to get to the reasons behind a clients' behavior and start helping right away. Traditional methods, such as talk therapy, spend much of their time merely trying to get past mental and emotional blockages, going down memory lane, so to speak, to understand the subconscious reasons for their patients' issues. Hypnosis doesn't need memory lane; it just needs someone ready and motivated for the change they wish to see in their lives. In 2001, the British Psychological Society reported that: "Enough studies have now accumulated to suggest that the inclusion of hypnotic procedures may be beneficial in the management and treatment of a wide range of conditions and problems encountered in the practice of medicine, psychiatry, and psychotherapy."
 

Will I lose control?

Losing control is a Hollywood myth. You always have control, and you can continuously hear what's going on. Hypnosis is a simple state of relaxed deep focus. It is a natural state that you enter at least twice a day, when falling asleep and right before waking up, And for some, probably much more often than that. If you want to come out of trance at any time, and you wish to be fully awake, you can count to yourself "1 - 2- 3" and open your eyes.

How do I choose a good hypnotherapist?

Talk to them over the phone; many offer a free consultation to make sure the two of you will make a good team. Ask questions! Ask about your concerns, any fears, how the process works, the fees involved, the time commitment, and anything that comes up for you.


Select a hypnotherapist that feels friendly and is easy for you to understand and follow. You'll be either in sessions or listening to recordings of their voice many times, so you need to be able to understand them and enjoy hearing their voice. Their voice should be pleasing to you.


If you are worried about qualifications, ask if they are members of any professional hypnotherapy organizations and about their training. Still, usually, most of this is already listed on their website. Ask them for their code of ethics if not readily available. Ask for references if you like! If they can't supply you with any, be wary. And, you can always check your local Better Business Bureau to see if there have been complaints filed in the past on this person.


All in all, you should be comfortable with the person's demeanor, voice, and instructional style. Often, the first 10 minutes of your free consultation with a hypnotherapist will be an introduction to hypnosis and a bit of chat about the changes you would like to make. If you find the hypnotherapist rubbing you the wrong way during or after, you should say that you don't think you are quite ready to move forward, then interview other hypnotherapists until you find one you like.

 

How is hypnotherapy different than affirmations?

Hypnotherapy has the benefit of being able to communicate with the subconscious mind in a two-way approach. When we use affirmations, it is in the attempt -often hope- to speak to our subconscious so that it results in the changes we seek. While affirmations are great daily reminders, they do not facilitate direct response from our subconscious mind, and this is why many who use them get frustrated with their outcomes.


A post-hypnotic suggestion is also unique because it is more direct, more specific, and more immediate. An affirmation of, "Every day I wake more positive than the day before" may ideally sound good, but it's missing the elements of; How will I know this? When can I be sure? Is it working? Am I more positive? With hypnosis, we set markers to let us know that you are making progress and getting the results you want.


The language of hypnosis and affirmations is similar as both are expressed in the present tense and offered positively. If you find a hypnotherapist that uses negation words like "don't smoke," "can't have,” "won’t fear” in a direct hypnotic suggestion: choose a different hypnotherapist!

 

What is my investment in hypnosis sessions?

Depending on what issue you want to deal with, your investment will vary. For a single 90 minute session covering one aspect, for example, motivation to exercise, and your hypnosis recording, it is $165. For mini follow-up sessions, if needed, $75 for 30minutes.

 

Should you choose an addiction topic, it will include 3 sessions. Often, when we start to shift our subconscious understanding on a deep leveled topic of addiction, other things pop up that are related to the topic at hand, and we need to address them as they appear so that we are better equipped to move through the transition smoothly.

3 sessions at $165 = $495. I offer a $50 discount for paying the package in full at your first session.

 

Bonus Options!

Many find great results with Hypnosis and enjoy using it to conquer many issues and create a clearing in their lives whether it's a good night's sleep, every night, or a set of goal setting strategies to keep your motivated at home or work, or wherever you may desire to shift your life.

 

6 months of sessions and recordings, one per month, $841, a 15% discount. (Reg. $990)

A full year of hypnosis healing for $1485, a 25% discount. (Reg. $1980)
 

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